Computer Vision API: What does it see?

Microsoft has a service called the Computer Vision API. It’s a simple system: feed it an image, and it analyzes the image and returns text feedback. This is not a simple analysis task, but the actual process for a user is amazingly streamlined. Naturally, very little time passed before this service was called up to provide automatic alternative text. And, honestly, this seems like an awesome way to do this! Who needs to take the time and effort to manually […]

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Themes are not web sites

Periodically, somebody asks me whether the themes reviewed for accessibility at WordPress.org are compliant with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. The simple answer is no; but the real answer is a little more complicated. The only real answer I can give is that the question isn’t applicable to themes. The clue is in the name of the guidelines themselves: they are Web Content Accessibility Guidelines. They aren’t guidelines that cover only navigation, design, and structure: they cover content and the […]

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Learning about WP to Twitter

April 27, 2016

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Topics: Blogging, WordPress.

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Given that I first wrote my plug-in WP to Twitter almost 8 years ago, and it’s been in continuous development since then, you might expect that I know all about it. But that would only be half the truth. What I know about WP to Twitter is the code base. I know how it works, I know why I made various decisions, and I know what I really want to change in future development. But I know very little about […]

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The myth of the keyboard-only user

An article I wrote on keyboard accessibility was published at Practical eCommerce magazine this morning. The topic is keyboard accessibility – what constitutes keyboard accessibility and how crucial it is for users who are blind, low-vision, or have mobility impairments. Which brings to mind the question: is there really such a thing as a fully keyboard-dependent user? This is a question that gets asked in accessibility communities occasionally. Most uses who are unable to use a standard mouse can still […]

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WordPress goes WCAG – what does it mean?

I would love to be able to say that the recent announcement that WordPress has embraced WCAG 2 level AA as a guideline for new code means that WordPress is going to instantly become amazingly accessible. But that wouldn’t be true. In fact, it doesn’t even guarantee that every new bit of code released will actually conform with WCAG AA. What it means is that our principles and our goals are to meet the standards required by the Web Content […]

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